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Protect Your Roof From Raccoons in Winter

Raccoons and roofs go hand in hand in many residential communities around the world. Urban areas that are in the vicinity of raccoon habitats are likely to be faced with raccoon invasion problems periodically. The roofs of buildings, in particular, are a favourite of raccoons. Many times experts trace raccoon invasion problems to one root cause, a roof that facilitates raccoon breaches. Once this notorious animal bandit makes its way into your roof and later into the remainder of your home, you will definitely need wildlife animal control services to help with raccoon removal.

Your home’s roof is often the ideal access point through which raccoons get into your home. Raccoons will scratch openings through already weakened sections of your roof.  Once raccoons are inside, they proceed to damage your attic by chewing and scratching almost everything in sight and ripping up insulation to make nests. Their waste (urine and feces) also speeds up the rotting process, especially for wooded areas. Remember also that raccoon waste harbours numerous diseases such as leptospirosis.  When raccoons make their way inside your home and establish their dens in the winter, it is quite difficult and time consuming to remedy the situation.

From the Roof to the Inside of Your Home

Outside of weak points, animals get through your roof and into your attic by way of your soffits, fascia, roof vents, loose shingles and joints that merge two roofs. Each wildlife species has its own motivations for travelling through your roof and into your space in the winter. Raccoons are usually drawn by the warmth and availability of food. Additionally, raccoons that are nursing will aim for your chimney as an ideal location to take care of her kits. These voracious foragers will wildly barrel through your garbage and your valuable items to find food. The mess they leave behind is often shocking to view.

With useful claws, raccoons can create an opening while on your roof to access the attic.

Protecting Your Roof (and Home) from Raccoons

The initial step in protecting your roof from raccoon each winter is having it professionally inspected and repaired. In doing this, you ensure that areas that raccoons could easily breach with a little effort are more robust and able to withstand the animal’s attacks. Where the access point is already open (gaps and holes in the roof) it is best to have them professionally sealed to ensure that the little critters do not make their way inside.

When you remove or eliminate the raccoon attractions in and around your home. You are also protecting your roof. The attractors include stored pet food and open garbage. While the absence of these attractions in no way represents a foolproof raccoon prevention strategy, it does help as some raccoons are attracted by potential food. Keeping the animals at bay will go a long way in ensuring that you do not have to call wildlife animal control services for raccoon removal assistance.

Ultimately, the best way to protect your roof from raccoon invasion is to get it reinforced by a team of experts. It is important however to ensure that the roofing specialist is advised of the potential for re-encounter with animals.  The best way to determine whether you have a potential animal invasion problem is to get experts like those at Skedaddle to assess the space and determine whether there are signs of animal infestation. It is also a good idea to get removal services once an invasion is confirmed (before starting roof repairs) so that your roof repairman does not get surprised by animals in your attic.

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About the author:Founder of Skedaddle Humane Wildlife Control in 1989. Canada's largest urban wildlife removal and exclusion company. Industry leader and pioneer. Split, Scram, Scoot! However you want to say it, Skedaddle Humane Wildlife Control has helped over 200,000 home owners and businesses safely and effectively resolve their wildlife issues. Happy to discuss business and franchising opportunities

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